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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Judy Woodruff
Co-Anchor and Managing Editor of the PBS NewsHour
KQED 10/15/2013
the Washington Post
Judy Woodruff
PBS Anchor and Managing Editor of PBS NewsHour
KQED 12/09/2013
Woodruff: The giants of the tech industry made a highly public appeal today to rein in government surveillance. it came in the form of an open letter to president Obama. the call for curbs focused on people's personal information being collected from online traffic. 545 Eight major companies, including Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Twitter, banded together to write an open letter to the president and congress. It appeared in full-page newspaper ads and (online)
Judy Woodruff
PBS Anchor and Managing Editor of PBS NewsHour
KQED 12/09/2013
Woodruff: online. the letter read in part: “The balance in many countries has tipped too far in favor of the state and away from the rights of the individual-rights that are enshrined in our Constitution. This undermines the freedoms we all cherish.” it's the tech giants' latest bid to salvage public trust, amid revelations that they've had to provide users' data to the government. the details come from edward snowden, who leaked a trove of material from the national security agency last summer.
Robert Gates
Former Secretary of Defense
KQED 01/14/2014
Woodruff: Do you think the NSA and many of the programs and practices have gone too far? Gates: The question is, whether NSA developed capabilities and applied those capabilities that went beyond the guidelines or the left and right curves if you will that the President and the Congress expected and were briefed on. And that's why I think that the White House review and the Congressional Review are so important and if the program did go beyond those guidelines, did go beyond those limits, to get it back within those limits and if, in fact, there were people who knowingly went beyond what the president had approved, that they be held accountable.
Judy Woodruff
Co-Anchor and Managing Editor of the PBS NewsHour
KQED 07/02/2014
Woodruff: A bipartisan government panel reported today the national security agency's internet surveillance is an effective tool against terrorism. A "Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board," a group appointed by the President, said the so-called "prism" program, under a provision of the foreign intelligence surveillance act, "section 702," is constitutional. David Medine chairs the board. Medine: Overall the board has found that the information the program collects has been valuable and effective in protecting the national security and producing valuable foreign intelligence information … outside of this fundamental core, certain aspects of the section 702 program do raise privacy concerns and push the program close to the line of constitutional reasonableness.
Judy Woodruff
Co-Anchor and Managing Editor of the PBS NewsHour
KQED 07/02/2014
Woodruff: The panel's report on internet surveillance contrasted sharply with its earlier finding on phone data collection. It said that effort lacked a viable legal foundation and should be shut down.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
KQED 05/22/2015
Woodruff: Senators came to work this morning, confronting an impasse on surveillance, and a looming deadline Leahy: Unfortunately, the clock's been run out. Woodruff: On June first, the National Security Agency loses legal authority to collect bulk phone records, as key provisions of the "Patriot Act" expire. But the Senate is leaving for the Memorial Day recess and won't return until June first leaving Vermont democrat Patrick Leahy to point across the capitol. Leahy: The house worked very hard on this. They completed their work and they left. They're not coming back until after the surveillance authorities are set to expire. And the House leadership has made clear they will my not pass the extension even if they're in.
Mitch McConnell
U.S. Senator (R-Kentucky), Senate Majority Leader
KQED 05/22/2015
Presiding Officer in the House: The yeas are 338 and the nays are 88. Woodruff: The bill that passed the House is the U.S.A. Freedom Act. It replaces bulk collection of phone records, with case-by-case searches. But senate majority leader Mitch McConnell is firmly opposed to that measure. McConnell: The untried and as of yet non-existent bulk collection system envisioned under that bill would be slower and more cumbersome than the one that currently helps keep us safe. At worst, it might not work at all. Woodruff: McConnell favors a two-month extension of the patriot act, to buy time for a compromise. Another proposal calls for a shorter extension. Other republicans strongly disagree. Kentucky's Rand Paul held the floor for 11 hours Wednesday. Paul: I will not let The Patriot Act, the most unpatriotic of acts, go unchallenged.
Harry Reid
U.S. Senator,( D-Nevada), Senate Minority Leader
KQED 05/22/2015
Woodruff: Many democrats, including Minority Leader Harry Reid, are also dug in against keeping The Patriot Act alive. Reid: There's efforts made to extend a program that's already been declared by the second circuit court of appeals of the united states, already declared is illegal. How can we extend an illegal act? But that's what some of the talk is from the other side of the aisle. Woodruff: This afternoon republican Richard Burr of North Carolina, chairing the intelligence committee, offered yet another option: Extend the Patriot Act, but end bulk data collection after two years. In the meantime, the Justice Department has announced the N.S.A. will have to start in winding down phone surveillance this weekend, to meet the June 1 deadline.
Judy Woodruff
Co-Anchor and Managing Editor of the PBS NewsHour
KQED 06/04/2015
Woodruff: There's word this evening of an extensive new government data breach. it's widely reported that suspected Chinese hackers broke into the Interior Department and the Office of Personnel Management, which handles security clearances. O.P.M. says data for four million people may be compromised. meanwhile,
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